book by dazzling book

kamounke:

“If you’re an adivasi [tribal Indian] living in a forest village and 800 CRP [Central Reserve Police] come and surround your village and start burning it, what are you supposed to do? Are you supposed to go on hunger strike? Can the hungry go on a hunger strike? Non-violence is a piece of theatre. You need an audience. What can you do when you have no audience? People have the right to resist annihilation.” - Arundhati Roy

kamounke:

“If you’re an adivasi [tribal Indian] living in a forest village and 800 CRP [Central Reserve Police] come and surround your village and start burning it, what are you supposed to do? Are you supposed to go on hunger strike? Can the hungry go on a hunger strike? Non-violence is a piece of theatre. You need an audience. What can you do when you have no audience? People have the right to resist annihilation.” - Arundhati Roy


tayarijones:

“Land of Love and Drowning is a marvel—epic and sweeping, yet intimate as a secret. It’s a tour de force combining naturalism and lyricism, myth and history. This is a story that feels ancient and modern at the same time. Tiphanie Yanique is a prodigiously talented new writer with a sharp voice, wicked humor, and compassion beyond measure.”
—Tayari Jones, author of Silver Sparrow

tayarijones:

Land of Love and Drowning is a marvel—epic and sweeping, yet intimate as a secret. It’s a tour de force combining naturalism and lyricism, myth and history. This is a story that feels ancient and modern at the same time. Tiphanie Yanique is a prodigiously talented new writer with a sharp voice, wicked humor, and compassion beyond measure.”

—Tayari Jones, author of Silver Sparrow


Tananarive Due on writing diverse science fiction interviewed by blacksci-fi.com. Excellent quick pointers here. 


What is your favorite book? from Anonymous

wordbookstores:

This has been sitting here for a while because we’re all basically incapable of picking a favorite book, but Katelyn & Jenn are willing to throw down:

Katelyn: The Shadow of the Wind, Carlos Ruiz Zafon. This is my favorite book of all time. It involves mystery and death and romance and libraries! How can you go wrong!? It’s the beginning of a series and I suggest all of them.

Jenn: Books and Islands in Ojibwe Country, Louise Erdrich. I never thought I’d be able to crown an all-time favorite, but I just finished this book and I think it was fate. Erdrich writes movingly about family, nature, and the importance of words, but most of all she is looking for answers to the question, “Books. Why?” And this is the question I’ve been trying to answer, both professionally and personally, since I learned to read. Everyone who reads should read this.